If you live in the state of Kentucky and are interested in possibly becoming a forensic scientist, you are probably wondering whether or not you are in a good place to do so. You will be happy to know that Kentucky is an excellent place to being a career in forensic science.

To begin with, the state is home to many fine higher learning institutions, such as traditional colleges and universities and even community colleges and trade and technical schools, the majority of which offer educational programs in forensic studies, forensic science, or related areas, such as criminal justice. This will make getting the education that you need in order to succeed a breeze.

One of the many schools you have to choose from in the state is Ashland Community and Technical College, located in Ashland, which offers associate’s degrees in corrections, criminal justice, law enforcement, and security and law enforcement.

There’s also Bellarmine University, in Louisville, with a bachelor’s degree program in criminal justice, and Bluegrass Community and Technical College of Lexington, with associate’s degree programs in criminal justice and security management.

Community college fans may also like Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, of Elizabethtown, offering associate’s degrees in criminal justice corrections, criminal justice law enforcement, criminal justice security and loss prevention, and in general criminal justice, or Community and Technical College at Covington, offering an associate’s degree program in criminal justice and certification in computer forensics.

Another community college choice is Hopkinsville Community College, located in Hopkinsville, offering associate’s degree programs in corrections, criminal justice, law enforcement, and security and loss prevention, as well as certification in computer forensics.

Plus, there’s Jefferson Community College in Louisville, with associate’s degree programs in corrections, criminal justice, law enforcement, security and loss prevention, and a certification program in computer forensics.

For those who like a school with diverse locations, Brown Mackie College is based in Fort Mitchell, Hopkinsville, and Louisville, and offers associate’s degree programs in criminal justice. Likewise, Daymar College has locations in Bellevue, Louisville, Newport, Owensboro, Paducah, and Scottsville, and offers both associate’s degree programs and bachelor’s degree programs in criminal justice.

ITT Technical Institute has locations in both Lexington and Louisville, and offers associate’s degree programs, both online and traditional, in criminal justice, as well as a bachelor’s degree in the same, including one with a focus on cyber security.

More traditional options include Kentucky State University at Frankfort, offering a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, and Kentucky Wesleyan College, located in Owensboro, with a bachelor’s degree program in criminal justice.

There’s also Lindsey Wilson College, in Columbia, offering a bachelor’s degree program in criminal justice, and Morehead State University at Morehead, which has bachelor’s degree programs in criminology, as well as a master’s degree program in the same.

Obviously, we have presented a wide range of different types of educational choices in the state, but keep in mind that these represent just a few of many from which you may select among. If you want an education in forensic science and you live in Kentucky, then you are most certainly in the right place.

In fact, the only real downside that could possibly be found with working in forensic science in Kentucky is that states in the southern region tend to have a lower than average standard salary for the profession. Currently, the average salary for a forensic scientist working in Kentucky is approximately $38,500 per year, compared to the national average of $45,000 per year. Through your own hard work, though, you can raise your salary significantly.